Promoting British Values at SSIS

 

Please see the table below to see how our school vision and curriculum actively promote the teaching of fundamental British values.

 

British Value

How do we teach this?

Evidence

Impact

Mutual Respect and the Tolerance of those with different Faiths and Beliefs

Respect is a fundamental school value which is communicated to children through our ‘Golden Rules’.

We pay explicit attention to this as part of our RE, PSHE [Jigsaw], and SMSC curriculum.

Our Golden Rules

Assembly planning and Class Assembly/Circle Time files.

RE curriculum

RE planning and work books.

e.g. visiting places of worship, comparing Christianity and Hinduism, celebrating festivals.

Learning Walks. Lesson and Lunchtime observations for behaviour.

Elli characters and positive learning behaviours/skills.

Children’s behaviour demonstrates their good understanding of this value in action. i.e. they follow the ‘Golden Rules’ and make ‘right choices’.

Children can articulate why respect is important; how they show respect to others and how they feel about it for themselves.

Children are able to talk about the different faiths and cultures they learn about, ask questions and show tolerance and respect for others of different faiths and religions.

Democracy

Democracy is a school value that children meet when discussing respect and fairness:

‘Golden Rules’.

Children’s voice is valued throughout the school at class and whole school level.

All children are involved in shaping the school’s future through the work of Class and School Council.

Whenever possible we model the democratic process formally and informally.

Children are given plenty of opportunities to share their views – across the curriculum.

Children are also taught to respect public institutions and service as part of their learning.

e.g. ‘People who help us.’ [EYFS]

School Council page on school website.

School Council minutes and records.

Our Golden Rules

Assembly planning and Class Assembly/Circle Time files.

RE curriculum.

RE planning and work books.

Voting opportunities are maximised as part of Class/School Council.

Also for St Stephen’s Got Talent competition.

Curriculum planning and learning.

e.g. English expressing viewpoint, persuasive texts

 

Children are able to work cooperatively in pairs and groups as well as in whole class situations.

They understand about turn taking and respecting the views of others.

Rule of Law

The school’s ‘Golden Rules’ and ‘Choices Ladder’ are given a very high profile by all staff. From Day 1 of Reception children are taught to understand the importance of making’ right choices’. Children are taught to understand that we need to make right choices to keep SSIS a ‘happy and safe place to learn’.

Our PSHE  [Jigsaw] and SMSC curriculum provide staff with further opportunities to embed our ‘rule of law.’

Children are familiar with the local police.

e.g. ’People who help us’ [EYFS]

Golden Rules

Choices Ladder

Elli Learning Skills.

PSHE [Jigsaw]/Citizenship SMSC curriculum.

School Council page on school website.

School Council minutes and records

Assembly planning and Class Assembly/Circle Time files.

Safeguarding governor visit notes.

Pupil conferencing.

Children are able to articulate why it is important to follow the Golden Rules.

Children understand the importance of making ‘right choices’ and the consequences of making ‘wrong choices.’

Children think the Golden Rules are strength of the school and that our Choices Ladder is ‘fair’.

 

Individual Liberty

Children are strongly encouraged to develop independence in learning and to think for themselves.

Our commitment to supporting the children in becoming confident, effective independent learners and citizens through use of Elli Learning skills.

Our Choices Ladder is fundamentally based on the children taking responsibility for their own action e.g. their ‘Choice.’

Golden Rules

Choices Ladder

Elli Learning Skills.

Safeguarding governor visit notes.

Pupil conferencing.

Children understand about the importance of accepting responsibility and of their right to be heard in school.

They are consulted on many aspects of school life and demonstrate independence of thought and action.